7 Ways to Help You Make it Rain

As a marketer, helping my wife Marilynn Richtarik with publicity for her edition of “Hopdance” has been a hands-on learning experience. Here’s what I’ve learned from those experiences—and how they can help you, too.

1. Start with quality

You can craft a successful campaign around a crappy product, but you better have lots of money. I’m fortunate that my wife has a strong track record of research and is a noted authority on the late Northern Irish playwright whose stylized autobiography she prepared for publication. And Stewart Parker was a craftsman whose words pop from the page. A reputable product from a reputable source.

2. Work your network

Marilynn has built up an impressive list of friends and acquaintances that she’s cultivated over a lifetime, not because of what they can do for her but because she likes to keep in touch. We’ve stayed with a woman and her family in Madrid who Marilynn had met once 25 years previously. Almost everywhere we go, she knows somebody. But the network isn’t just one way—Marilynn will do whatever she can to help her friends and colleagues. We send upwards of 120 snail mail holiday cards each year with family picture and letter.

3. Don’t wait to be asked

“Hopdance” is published by The Lilliput Press, an independent press that took a chance on a one-off project from a deceased playwright. Their resources are limited and concentrated on Ireland, not the UK, so much of the initiative on publicity is left to authors. Marilynn has contributed articles to The Irish Times and the Culture Northern Ireland website, been interviewed on a well-regarded arts radio program, and arranged three “Hopdance” readings in Belfast and at least one in another UK city. More events, interviews and contributed articles are in the works but not yet finalized.

She developed contact lists for Dublin and Belfast to publicize these events with press releases and also created a list of possible readers/reviewers for the press. She knew the presenter of the arts program and the editor of the website, but the Irish Times piece and the ones in the works are with people she hadn’t met and contacted out of the blue.

4. No square pegs for round holes

By focusing precisely on the sweet spots, Marilynn has been able to maximize her efforts. Not every publication, website or bookstore will be interested in the book, so we’re not wasting time trying in those areas.

5. Think outside the box

But it pays to think about the larger possibilities. The appearance at the Belfast Book Festival is a direct result of my research. We’ve contacted several other book festivals I found out about, although those are longer-term projects. Marilynn parlayed her last book project, the 2012 biography Stewart Parker: A Life, into three years of Thanksgiving break university visits. She’s already making plans to take “Hopdance” on the road this fall.

6. Reuse, revise, leverage

Reusing content is all the rage in marketing circles, such as turning the seven points in this blog post into a graphic. Think about how you can leverage what you have in new and different ways. For example, Marilynn persuaded a local arts and culture website to post a recording of her first public talk about the book. Now when approaching bookstores and book festivals about potential events, she can point them to the website to hear her performance.

7. Ask for help

Not everyone has in-house marketing resources. You marketing efforts must be concise and well-targeted to succeed, so if you don’t have those skills within your company (or within your household), consider bringing in an expert.

You likely know your product and your market better than a marketing writer, but a professional writer knows how to speak to your target audience(s) in ways that you don’t.

Marilynn is an incredibly talented academic writer whose work also appeals to a wider audience. But she knows squat about marketing writing. Even she needed a little help to publicize the readings, find new audiences and discover new potential sales avenues.